Headless Ancestors and Ghouls: the Plastered Human Skulls of Jericho and the Origins of Agriculture

Ian Kuijt, University of Notre Dame
December 2, 2009
7:00 pm, Breasted Hall

Since the 1950s, when archaeologists at Jericho recovered several Neolithic plastered human skulls, researchers have debated the purpose and meaning of skull removal and plastering. This lecture highlights recent fieldwork in Israel, Jordan, and Syria that has documented the widespread use of these practices some 10,500 years ago, which clearly identifies that the elaborate manipulation of the dead was central to ritual and everyday life within the world’s first agricultural villages.

Lectures are free and open to the public thanks to the generous support of Oriental Institute Members. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the Membership Office for for assistance.

This event is free, open to the public, with reception to follow. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.