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ORIENTAL INSTITUTE ANNOUNCEMENTS



This is where INFORMATION about the Oriental Institute is announced.



October 31, 2006

Oriental Institute Job Posting

Membership Coordinator

The Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois

The University of Chicago's Oriental Institute is an internationally recognized research center and museum for studying the archaeological and textual record of the ancient Near East. A primary unit within the Institute is its membership office.

The Membership Coordinator is responsible for planning, implementing, and managing membership relations for the Oriental Institute. This includes supervising the processing of new memberships and renewals, managing the members' travel program, coordinating membership events and overseeing the development of membership communications such as our annual report, quarterly newsletters and general membership announcements.

A bachelor's degree and the ability to work some evenings and weekends required; minimum of one year professional experience in membership and/or development in a non-profit setting preferred.

We seek a highly motivated individual with excellent writing, organization, and interpersonal skills.

To apply for this position, please apply online at the University of Chicago's job posting website at http://jobs.uchicago.edu

Requisition #: 074399

Applications must be received by November 24th, 2006.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

October 31, 2006

Oriental Institute Job Posting

Assistant Professor in Egyptian Archaeology and Art History

The Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois

The Oriental Institute and the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Chicago invite applications for a tenure-track position of Assistant Professor in Egyptian Archaeology and Art History with a starting date in Fall, 2007.

Applicants should have broad competence in archaeological method and theory in addition to the archaeology and art of ancient Egypt. All areas of concentration will be considered, but a focus on periods preceding the New Kingdom is desirable. The successful applicant is expected to have or develop a field program, to engage in research, both individual and collaborative, and to teach introductory and specialized courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. All applicants should have the Ph.D. completed at the time of application.

Please submit a letter of application, a curriculum vitae, and a list of 3 referees (including e-mail addresses whenever possible) before December 8, 2006, to:

Chair, Egyptian Archaeology and Art History Search Committee
The Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
1155 East 58th Street
Chicago IL 60637.
U.S.A.

Inquiries and electronic submissions may be sent by e-mail to d-whitcomb@uchicago.edu with a copy to oeboyd@uchicago.edu (subject heading “Egyptian Archaeology Search).

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

September 14, 2006

Chicago-Johns Hopkins Theban Workshop

The Chicago-Johns Hopkins Theban Workshop convenes on an annual basis to discuss current research and problems pertaining to the Theban region (modern Luxor). Past themes have included the foundation of empire at the beginning of the Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom, tombs in western Thebes, and sacred space and sacred function. This year’s theme is devoted to:

Perspectives on Ptolemaic Thebes

University of Chicago
October 14, 2006

9:00AM Welcome: Peter Dorman (Oriental Institute, University of Chicago)
9:15 AM Joe Manning (Stanford University)
“The Ptolemaic Capture of the Thebaid”
10:00 AM Robert Ritner (Oriental Institute, University of Chicago)
“Ptolemy IX (Soter II) at Thebes”
10:45 AM Coffee break
11:00 AM Carolin Arlt (University of Würzburg)
“Scribal Offices and Scribal Families in Ptolemaic Thebes”
12 noon Lunch
1:30 PM J. Brett McClain (Oriental Institute, University of Chicago)
“Ptolemaic Cosmogonical Inscriptions and Cultic Transformation in the Temple of Djeser-set”
2:15 PM Jasnow (Johns Hopkins University) and Christina Di Cerbo (Oriental Institute, University of Chicago)
“Recent Documentation of Medinet Habu Graffiti by the Epigraphic Survey”
3:00 PM Coffee break
3:15 PM Sabine Albersmeier (Walters Art Gallery)
“Ptolemaic Statues of Priestesses from Thebes”
4:00 PM Ian Moyer (Pomona College)
“Finding the ‘Middle Ground’: Cultures of Greek and Egyptian Elites in the Ptolemaic Thebaid”
4:45 PM Closing remarks: Betsy Bryan (Johns Hopkins University)
August 17, 2006

New Oriental Institute Archaeological Research Project
At the site of Zincirli (ancient Sam'al) in southeast Turkey

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago is starting a new long-term excavation project at the site of Zincirli (ancient Sam'al) in southeast Turkey. The excavations will be directed on behalf of the Oriental Institute by Dr. David Schloen. The first season of fieldwork will take place in August-September 2006.

The Zincirli project is the most recent expression of an eighty-year-long tradition of archaeological research cooperation between the Oriental Institute and the government of Turkey.

Zincirli is a 40-hectare Bronze and Iron Age urban center located immediately to the east of the Amanus mountain range in Gaziantep province of southeast Turkey. Early excavations were conducted at the site by the German Oriental Society from 1888 to 1902. There have been no archaeological excavations at Zincirli for more than a century.

Ceramics found by the early excavators reveal a long sequence of occupation in the Bronze Age. After the collapse of the Hittite Empire, Zincirli flourished as the center of an Iron Age city-state ruled by Luwian and Aramaean kings. It was later incorporated into the Assyrian Empire and ultimately destroyed and abandoned in the seventh century B.C.

Zincirli is notable for its enormous double fortification wall with three gates and 100 bastions enclosing the as-yet-unexcavated lower town. The German excavations on the citadel recovered large numbers of relief-carved orthostats, along with inscriptions in Aramaic, Phoenician, Luwian, and Akkadian. These are on exhibit in Berlin and Istanbul.

The new Oriental Institute excavations at Zincirli will allow us to investigate key research problems such as: a) the Late Bronze-Iron Age transition, b) the ethno-linguistic dynamics of Neo-Hittite city-states in this border region between Anatolia and Syria, and c) Assyrian imperial administration. The ease of access to seventh-century B.C. deposits immediately beneath the surface due to the circumstances of the site's destruction and abandonment provides a rare opportunity to make broad horizontal exposures of an Iron Age urban center.

The data generated by the planned long-term excavations at Zincirli can make significant contributions to our understanding of the social, political, and economic organization of this pivotal region in the Bronze and Iron Ages.

The Oriental Institute now sponsors two major excavations in Turkey: the Zincirli Expedition and the Joint METU- (Middle East Technical University)-Chicago excavations at Kerkenes Dag.

August 16, 2006

Oriental Institute Job Posting

Security and Visitor Services Supervisor

The Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois

The University of Chicago's Oriental Institute is an internationally recognized research center and museum for studying the archaeological and textual record of the ancient Near East. A primary unit within the Institute is its public museum which serves 60,000 visitors each year.  The Security and Visitor Services Supervisor is responsible for the security and visitor experience of the Oriental Institute facility and its museum galleries.  Candidates are expected to have experience in security, visitor services or a combination of the two.  We seek a highly motivated individual who is skilled in the management of guard staffing, can interact with a diverse group of clients, is able to balance the security needs of the Institute while allowing for positive visitor experiences for the public and who can introduce innovative approaches to security and guest services.

To apply for this position, please apply online at the University of Chicago’s job posting website at http://jobs.uchicago.edu

Applications must be received by September 15, 2006.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity Employer.

May 31, 2006

Oriental Institute Retirement Announcement

Thomas Holland, Managing Editor

Oriental Institute Publications Office

Please join me in congratulating Tom Holland on his outstanding, 22-year career at the Oriental Institute. Tom announced his retirement this past week and has chosen December 31st, 2006 as his last official day on the second floor.

Tom has been a member of the Oriental Institute since 1984, holding positions as Senior Editor and Research Associate. He brought with him a wealth of experience from distinguished institutions such as Cambridge and Oxford Universities as well as the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem where he was Acting Director. He has excavated at key sites in the mid-east such as Petra, Jordan, Tell Brak, Syria and Umm Dabaghiyah, Iraq. He skillfully edited and managed Oriental Institute publications throughout his years at the Institute and will be witnessing the upcoming release of his own publication, Volume II - Tell es-Sweyhat: Archaeology of the Bronze Age, Hellenistic and Roman Remains from an Ancient Town on the Euphrates River, due this fall. A number of events are planned for the beginning of December, including a series of slide show presentations from Tom’s personal slide collection featuring views of the Nile during the 1960’s and photos from Syria and Jordan with many interesting photos of distinguished individuals in the field, from Seton Lloyd to Kathleen Kenyon.

I hope you will join in thanking Tom for his dedication and professionalism throughout his time at the Institute and wish him well as he pursues future endeavors in retirement.

March 31, 2006
March 31, 2006

Symposium on Ancient Nubia

Ancient Nubia: Glory and Grandeur Along the Nile
Saturday, May 6, 2006
9:30am – 5pm
Breasted Hall, Oriental Institute

Presented by the Oriental Institute and the Graham School of General Studies of the University of Chicago . Co-sponsored by the Chicago Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America

March 17, 2006

Oriental Institute Job Posting

Demotic Dictionary Research Associate

The Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois

The Chicago Demotic Dictionary Project (CDD) of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago is searching for a scholar to assist with the completion of this dictionary project. The successful candidate must have a Ph.D., extensive background in Demotic (as well as knowledge of other stages of Egyptian; knowledge of Greek or Aramaic useful), an interest in lexicography, and a commitment to precision and respect for details; wide bibliographic knowledge would also be useful. Duties will include proofreading, checking, and editing draft manuscript of the CDD, preparation of scans and facsimiles of lexical items included in the manuscript, and informed addition of material and references to the manuscript. This person will also supervise student employees and volunteers working on the CDD. The initial appointment, as Research Associate, will be for one year, beginning July 1, 2006. The job may be renewable annually for up to a maximum of five (5) years.

Applications should include CV, names of 2-3 referees, and a statement of qualifications and experience. Apply online at uchicago.edu or send via e-mail to Janet H. Johnson: j-johnson@uchicago.edu.

For consideration, applications must be received by May 1, 2006.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

March 6, 2006

Oriental Institute Job Posting

Post Doctoral Fellow

The Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago invites applications for the Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship program for the 2006-2007 academic year. This is a twelve month, non-renewable fellowship. The Post-Doctoral Fellow will organize and conduct a one-to-two day conference at the Oriental Institute on key comparatively-oriented theoretical or methodological issues in the field of ancient studies (archaeological, text-based, and/or art historical avenues of research). We encourage cross disciplinary proposals that deal with the ancient Near East (including Egypt) or that compare the Near East with other cultural areas. The conference will take place in mid-February 2007. After the conference, the Fellow will assemble and edit the proceedings for publication by the Oriental Institute. The Fellow is also encouraged to pursue his or her own research while in residence and to interact with the Oriental Institute community. Salary for this position is $40,000 plus benefits.

Qualifications: Ph.D. in a discipline relating to ancient studies must be complete at the time of application. Applicants should send:
a) 5-page proposal outlining nature and structure of the conference (including names and paper topics of five to eight key participants who have agreed to make presentations, should the conference be funded)
b) curriculum vitae
c) 3 letters of reference (these may be sent under separate cover).
Electronic submissions are welcome.

Deadline for completed applications is April 30, 2006. Start date is September 1, 2006.

Please send applications to: Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship, attn.
Olivia Boyd, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, 1155 East 58th St., Chicago, IL 60637. e-mail: oeboyd@uchicago.edu

January 27, 2006

The Cultural Policy Center at The University of Chicago, The University of Chicago Law School, and The Oriental Institute at The University of Chicago present:

PROTECTING CULTURAL HERITAGE: International Law After The War In Iraq

Friday, February 3, 2006, from 3:00 – 5:00 PM, at the Weymouth Kirkland Courtroom, University of Chicago Law School, 1111 East 60th Street.

The one-day working conference will culminate with a panel discussion open to the public.

November 29, 2005

Oriental Institute Job Posting: Tenure-track position in Hittitology

The Oriental Institute and the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Chicago invite applications for a tenure-track position in Hittitology that will be occupied in Fall, 2006.

Applicants should have broad competence in Hittite and Anatolian languages and cultures, with a firm background in Akkadian. Familiarity with Hurrian is recommended. The successful applicant is expected to engage in research, both individual and as part of the Chicago Hittite Dictionary Project, and to teach introductory and specialized courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Junior-level candidates are strongly encouraged to apply but all levels will be considered. All applicants should have the Ph.D. completed at the time of application.

Please submit a letter of application, a curriculum vitae with list of publications, and a list of 3-5 referees (including e-mail addresses whenever possible) before January 15, 2006, to:

Chair, Hittitology Search Committee
The Oriental Institute
1155 E. 58th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
U.S.A.

Inquiries and electronic submissions may be sent by email to tvdhout@uchicago.edu with a copy to oeboyd@uchicago.edu.

The University of Chicago is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

November 7, 2005

Oriental Institute Job Posting: Research Associate

Research Associate required for an ongoing research project at the Oriental Institute, University of Chicago. The successful applicant must be proficient in ArcGIS, ENVI, show familiarity with ASTER, Spot and Corona data. Research focus must include Mesopotamian archaeology, landscape and geo-archaeology. The main task for this research position is to compile, synthesize and analyze data on the ancient landscape of southern Mesopotamia. The research associate will be part of a multi-disciplinary team modeling the development of early settlement systems within their economic and environmental context. Some experience with computer application and the study of ancient agricultural systems is preferred.

Apply online via jobs link at www.uchicago.edu by 12/4/05.

August 2, 2005

Dr. Magnus Widell becomes Head of Oriental Institute Research Archives

The Oriental Institute is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Magnus Widell as the new Head of Research Archives. Magnus has studied Assyriology in Uppsala, Vienna and Changchun, and his research focuses on socio-economic, environmental and agricultural issues. For the past 2 1/2 years Magnus has been working as a Research Associate at the OI within the project, "Modeling Ancient Settlement Systems." This project, funded by the National Science Foundation's biocomplexity program, is working to create an interactive framework for modeling the social, agricultural and economic systems of ancient city-states in the Near East.

Magnus's agenda for the upcoming year and beyond is to build on many of the projects and programs that Chuck Jones developed over his years of exemplary service to the Archives. This includes, but is not limited to, updating and improving the online catalogue of research material, and continuing the Archives involvement in academic electronic communications.

April 29, 2005

Oriental Institute Job Posting: Head of Research Archives

Head of Research Archives

The Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois

The University of Chicago's Oriental Institute is an internationally recognized research center for studying the archaeological and textual record of the ancient Near East. A primary unit within the Institute is its Research Archives, a rapidly growing research facility with over thirty-seven thousand volumes covering the full range of scholarship on the Ancient Near East. The Head of Research Archives ensures the quality of the collections of the Library and provides objective assessment of needs in all areas of scholarship on the Ancient Near East; provides reference service to inquiries from national and international academic communities; manages the collections, acquisition and cataloging of material; supervises facility personnel and resources; and maintains and develops the on-line catalogue of the Research Archives collections. The Head of Research Archives is expected to participate actively in the intellectual life of the Oriental Institute and in the broader field of Ancient Near Eastern studies. Candidates must have academic experience in one or more fields of Near Eastern studies, and a demonstrated background or advanced degree in the field of library sciences.

To apply for this position, please apply online at http://jobs.uchicago.edu, or send a CV and cover letter via mail to Gil Stein, Director, Oriental Institute, 1155 East 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, or email to gstein@uchicago.edu.

Applications must be received by May 23rd, 2005.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity Employer.
April 4, 2005
February 7, 2005

Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship for 2005-2006 Academic Year

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago invites applications for the Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship program for the 2005-2006 academic year. This is a twelve month, non-renewable fellowship. The Post-Doctoral Fellow will organize and conduct a one-to-two day conference at the Oriental Institute on key comparatively-oriented theoretical or methodological issues in the field of ancient studies (archaeological, text-based, and/or art historical avenues of research). We encourage cross disciplinary proposals that deal with the ancient Near East (including Egypt) or that compare the Near East with other cultural areas. The conference will take place in mid-February 2006. After the conference, the Fellow will assemble and edit the proceedings for publication by the Oriental Institute. The Fellow is also encouraged to pursue his or her own research while in residence and to interact with the Oriental Institute community. Qualifications: Ph.D. in a discipline relating to ancient studies must be complete at the time of application. Applicants should send: a) 5-page proposal outlining nature and structure of the conference (including names and paper topics of five to eight key participants who have agreed to make presentations, should the conference be funded) b) curriculum vitae, c) 3 letters of reference (these may be sent under separate cover). Electronic submissions are welcome. Deadline for completed applications is April 30, 2005. Start date is September 1, 2005.

Send applications to:

Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship
Attn. Olivia Boyd
Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
1155 East 58th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
e-mail: oebiyd@uchicago.edu
December 14, 2004

Oriental Institute Conference, February 25-26, 2005

Margins of writing, origins of cultures:
Unofficial writing in the ancient Near East and beyond

This is a conference on the politics of writing in the ancient Near East: what happens when people write their own languages, in environments dominated by imperial standard languages like Egyptian, Babylonian or Aramaic? This conference will be the first of its type, bringing together linguists, anthropologists, and scholars of the ancient Near East to discuss new directions for research. Among the senior scholars participating will be Harvard's Peter Machinist (Hebrew Bible), Chicago's Michael Silverstein (Linguistic Anthropology), Michigan's Piotr Michalowski (Assyriology), and Theo van den Hout, executive editor of the Chicago Hittite Dictionary. Younger scholars include William Schniedewind, (UCLA) whose recent How the Bible Became a Book is arguably the first study of the Bible to see the question of writing as decisive for both literature and history, and John Kelly (Chicago), author of the forthcoming Technography, a study in the anthropology of knowledge focusing on the grammarians of ancient India and the engineering of Sanskrit.

For More Information

Conference Organizer, Seth L. Sanders
sanders@uchicago.edu
773-834-3290
1155 E. 58th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
November 30, 2004

Diyala Project connects Chicago and Baghdad museum collections

"The story of the origins of urban civilization in Mesopotamia will soon become more accessible to academics and school children around the world as a result of a $100,000 National Endowment for the Humanities grant to the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago."

Read the University of Chicago Press Release

November 12, 2004

The 51st Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale
Will be held at the University of Chicago, July 18-22, 2005

All forms are available on the web.
Please go to: http://www.let.leidenuniv.nl/rencontre/RAI_2005.html

There you will find the following links and forms: (1) Important Information, (2) Information on On-Campus Accommodations, (3) Registration & Payment Form, and (4) Accommodations Form.

The Registration & Payment Form and the Accommodations Form MUST be faxed or mailed to the organizers, with payment and deposit, to secure your participation in the Rencontre. Fax number & mailing address is listed on the Leiden University website.

November 8, 2004

Position: Tenure-track position in Comparative Semitics


The Oriental Institute and the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Chicago invite applications for a tenure-track position in Comparative Semitics that will be occupied in Fall, 2005.

Applicants should have broad competence in Semitic languages as well as depth in an area of specialization. The successful applicant is expected to engage in research, both individual and collaborative, and to teach introductory and specialized courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels.

Junior-level candidates are strongly encouraged to apply, but all levels will be considered. All applicants should have the Ph.D. in hand at the time of application.

Please submit a letter of application, a curriculum vitae, and a list of 3-5 referees (including e-mail addresses whenever possible) before December 31, 2004, to:

Chair, Comparative Semitics Search Committee
The Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
1155 East 58th Street
Chicago IL 60637
U.S.A.

Inquiries and electronic submissions may be sent by e-mail to w-farber@uchicago.edu with a copy to oeboyd@uchicago.edu.

The University of Chicago is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

November 8, 2004

Excavations Reinforce Prof. Golb's Contention Of Where Dead Sea Scrolls Originated

Discoveries in Israel now reinforce the view of Norman Golb that the Dead Sea Scrolls were not written exclusively or even largely by the Essene sect of antiquity. Golb, the Ludwig Rosenberger Professor of Jewish History and Civilization in Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations and the College, contends that the scrolls were the product of many hands and represent a broad range of perspectives rather than just the thinking of a tight-knit religious group.

For More Information

November 5, 2004

Film On Hittite Empire Features O.I. Scholars, Complements Their Work

November 11, 2004, at 7 pm

Breasted Hall at the Oriental Institute
1155 East 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

A feature-length movie, "The Hittites: The Empire that Changed The World," will make its Midwest premiere at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 11, in Breasted Hall at the Oriental Institute. Theo van den Hout, Professor of Hittite and Anatolian Languages and Editor of the "Chicago Hittite Dictionary," as well as Tolga Ornek, the film's writer, director and producer, will speak after the screening of the film at 9 p.m.

For More Information

May 11, 2004

Memorial Service for Jeremy Black in Chicago

June 3, 2004, at 4 pm

Service will be in the Thorndike Hilton Chapel of the Chicago Theological Seminary

5757 S. University Ave
(across 58th St. from the Oriental Institute)

May 10, 2004

Papers in Comparative Semitics
A Symposium in Honor of Gene B. Gragg

May 21 and 22, 2004

Breasted Hall
Oriental Institute, University of Chicago
1155 E. 58th Street

The Symposium is Free and Open to All

Persons with disabilities contact Nicole Torres -- 773-834-8098

Daily Schedule of Speakers and Events (In Adobe Acrobat PDF Format)

Sponsored by The Oriental Institute, The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, The Department of Linguistics, The Division of the Humanities, and The College.

April 16, 2004

New Museum Director Leads Archaeologists At Tell Brak

Geoff Emberling, an archaeologist with extensive research experience in Syria, will become Director of the Museum of the Oriental Institute on Wednesday, May 26, when he concludes his duties as field director of the Archaeological Expedition to Tell Brak, a joint project between the United States and Britain.

Read the entire article in the University of Chicago Chronicle

April 16, 2004

Archaeologists Review Loss Of Valuable Artifacts One Year After Looting

A year after the looting of the Iraqi National Museum, Oriental Institute archaeologists continue to track missing artifacts. And their work is playing a pivotal role in helping recover items stolen from the museum in Baghdad between April 9 and 11, 2003.

Read the entire article in the University of Chicago Chronicle

April 2, 2004

WTTW 11, Chicago Public Television, Announces
"Breaking Ground: The Story of the Oriental Institute."

WTTW11 Chicago, the most-watched public television station in the United States, is delighted to announce the premiere of "Breaking Ground: The Story of the Oriental Institute." This one-hour documentary, produced by Emmy Award-winner Leonard Aronson, tells the remarkable story of the Institute's creation and its herculean efforts of the 1920s and 1930s, profiles the Institute's initiatives to bring the world of the ancient Near East to the general public, and attempts to capture the spirit of patient, rigorous inquiry that distinguishes the Institute in the scholarly world. In addition to footage from the Chicago headquarters, "Breaking Ground" includes substantial treatments, shot in the fall of 2003 on Digibeta videotape, of Institute work being carried out at Tell Atchana and by the Epigraphic Survey in and around Luxor.

"Breaking Ground: The Story of the Oriental Institute" will premiere on WTTW11 in Chicago on Thursday, May 27, 2004, at 9:00 PM. Repeat broadcasts currently scheduled are: 3:30 AM on Saturday, May 29, 2004 and 10:00 PM on Wednesday, June 2, 2004.

A companion half-hour documentary, "Pioneer to the Past: The Life and Times of James Henry Breasted," will premiere in June. WTTW11 anticipates that both programs will be re-aired on an occasional basis over the coming years.

Both programs were generously underwritten by LaSalle Bank/ABN AMRO and Commonwealth Edison, an Exelon Company.

For more information, please contact Tim Cashion at tcashion@wttw.com or 773-509-5553.

March 4, 2004

Dr. Geoffrey Emberling, new director of The Oriental Institute Museum

The Oriental Institute is delighted to welcome Dr. Geoffrey Emberling as the new director of its Museum of the Oriental Institute. Geoff received an A.B. in 1987 from Harvard University in anthropology. earned his M.A. in anthropology in 1991, a second M.A. in Near Eastern studies in 1994, and his Ph.D. in anthropology and Near Eastern studies in 1995, all from the University of Michigan.

Geoff is an extraordinarily talented young scholar who combines scholarly expertise, outstanding abilities as an archaeological field director, and curatorial experience through his previous work at the Near Eastern section at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He has spent the last six years as field director of the excavations at Tell Brak, where his research has focused on the fourth and third millennium occupations of this North Syrian urban center. Geoff will lead the Museum of the Oriental Institute through the completion of its gallery installation, while defining new directions for this world-class collection of Near Eastern artifacts. He will officially start as Museum Director May 26, 2004, after he returns from his fieldwork in Syria.

March 4, 2004

CONFERENCE IN ITALY WILL HONOR OBADIAH,
WHOM GOLB STUDIED IN EARLY RESEARCH

A major academic conference will be held in a small city in southern Italy in late March to honor a town celebrity from the Middle Ages, Obadiah the Proselyte, who became known to scholars in the 20th century and whose fame was enhanced nearly 40 years ago in Norman Golb's pioneering work. Golb, the Ludwig Rosenberger Professor of Jewish History and Civilization in Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations, will serve as honorary president of the International Conference on Chronicler-Musician Obadiah the Proselyte, a convert to Judaism who set Hebrew texts to music similar to Gregorian chant.

Learn More In The University of Chicago Chronicle Article

March 4, 2004

Post Doctoral Fellow

University of Chicago
Oriental Institute

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago invites applications for the Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship program for the 2004-2005 academic year. This is a twelve month, non-renewable fellowship. The Post-Doctoral Fellow will organize and conduct a one-to-two day conference at the Oriental Institute on key comparatively-oriented theoretical or methodological issues in the field of ancient studies (archaeological, text-based, and/or art historical avenues of research). We encourage cross disciplinary proposals that deal with the ancient Near East (including Egypt) or that compare the Near East with other cultural areas. The conference will take place in mid-February 2005. After the conference, the Fellow will assemble and edit the proceedings for publication by the Oriental Institute. The Fellow is also encouraged to pursue his or her own research while in residence and to interact with the Oriental Institute community. Qualifications: Ph.D. in a discipline relating to ancient studies must be complete at the time of application. Applicants should send: a) 5-page proposal outlining nature and structure of the conference (including names and paper topics of key participants) b) curriculum vitae, c) 3 letters of reference (these may be sent under separate cover). Electronic submissions are welcome.

Deadline for completed applications is April 30, 2004. Start date is September 1, 2004. Please send applications to: Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship, attn. Nicole Torres, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, 1155 East 58th St., Chicago, IL 60637.

e-mail: nitorres@uchicago.edu (with cc to gstein@uchicago.edu).

February 13, 2004

Position: Development Director, Oriental Institute

Location: University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

The University of Chicago's Oriental Institute is an internationally recognized research center and museum for studying the archaeological and textual record of the ancient Near East. The Development Director leads fundraising programs to meet the current and future financial goals of the Institute. Responsibilities include; planning and implementing fundraising strategies, identifying and soliciting gifts from prospects, foundations or corporations, and organizing fundraising events.

To apply for this position, or for additional information, please go to University of Chicago Jobs website (jobs.uchicago.edu), create a profile and apply for requisition #066646.

January 6, 2004

Oriental Institute Reserach Associate, Clemens Reichel, Named
One of Six Chicagoans of the Year 2003

Chicago Magazine, in its January 2004 issue, has named Oriental Institute Reserach Associate, Clemens Reichel, one of its six Chicagoans of the Year 2003, for his tireless efforts in the development of the Institute's Iraq Museum Database project.

Congratulations Clemens!!!

November 20, 2003

Position: Museum Director, Museum of the Oriental Institute

Location: Chicago, Illinois

The University of Chicago's Oriental Institute is an internationally recognized research center for studying the archaeological and textual record of the ancient Near East. A primary unit within the Institute is its Museum, which houses over 126,000 registered objects from across the Near East. We seek applicants for the position of Museum Director, who reports to the Director of the Oriental Institute and interacts regularly with the Institute's research faculty, who serve as its governing board. Candidates must have academic experience in a Near Eastern field of specialty, ideally in one of the areas covered by the Oriental Institute's collections (Egypt, Nubia, Mesopotamia, Syria-Palestine, Anatolia, Iran) and have demonstrated experience in curatorial duties, exhibit development, and grant writing. The Museum of the Oriental Institute is in the midst of a multi-year reinstallation process that will provide the right candidate with the opportunity to have a direct impact on the Museum's collections, gallery design, and future exhibits. We seek candidates with demonstrated leadership and project management skills to manage a staff of over twenty, with administrative responsibility for subunits such as registration, conservation, and public education.

To apply for this position, please go to University of Chicago Jobs website, create a profile and apply for requisition #066208 by December 31, 2003.

Women, minorities, and junior and senior applicants are encouraged to apply. The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity Employer.

October 29, 2003

Dr. Karen Wilson resigns as Oriental Institute Museum Director

I am sorry to report to you that Dr. Karen Wilson has resigned from her position as Director of the Museum of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago in order to pursue opportunities elsewhere. During the fifteen years of her affiliation with the museum, Dr. Wilson has made tremendous contributions as a curator, scholar, exhibit planner, administrator, and communicator with the public. During her tenure at the helm of the Oriental Institute Museum she planned and executed the extraordinarily complex tasks of building a new wing, renovating all of the existing museum space, and the critically important introduction of climate control. The beautiful, newly completed Mesopotamian Gallery is the most recent and spectacular of her contributions.

Dr. Wilson will continue in her position through December 1, 2003. I think I speak for everyone in the Oriental Institute community in thanking her for all she has done and in wishing her every success in her next career step.

The Oriental Institute will soon announce a global search for her successor.

Gil J. Stein, Director
The Oriental Institute
October 28, 2003

Special Projects Manager. Oriental Institute, University of Chicago.

Work with key personnel to select and secure funding for special exhibits and investigate the feasibility of temporary Oriental Institute based exhibits and traveling exhibits. Write public relations related articles, produce development literature for distribution, and assist in the production of internal publications. Develop a planned giving program. Write grants to foundations and federal/non-federal entities. Assist in the development and implementation of a publicity strategy. Write press releases for designated functions. Manage the OI tour program, plan events, produce literature, and lead tours. Develop a corporate membership program. Advise and aid the education office in the preparation of educational materials related to their programs. Attend quarterly programming meetings and help determine nature of programs. Advise on the implementation of educational programs. Support the ongoing writing of grants that fund educational programs.

Qualifications: Bachelor's degree required; familiarity with Chicago area community preferred; excellent writing, organization, and interpersonal skills required; some weekend and evening work required; some domestic and foreign travel required.

For further information: http://jobs.uchicago.edu/
October 24, 2003

WESTERN TEAM ALLOWED IN IRAN FOR EXPEDITION

For the first time since 1979, a University of Chicago archaeological expedition has begun digging in southwest Iran, an area known as Khuzestan. The new research will provide additional information on a region where some of antiquity's most dramatic hydro-engineering projects were once located. This work also renews important research connections between Iran and the University that began with the work of an Oriental Institute team-the first Western team permitted to do work there-between World War I and World War II.
October 18, 2003
October 13, 2003

The Oriental Institute's Edgar and Deborah Jannotta Mesopotamian Gallery on WTTW

Chicago's Public Television station, WTTW (Channel 11), on its weekly arts magazine program Artbeat Chicago, will have a segment profiling the newly-reinstalled Edgar and Deborah Jannotta Mesopotamian Gallery at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.

This Artbeat Chicago program will air on Friday, October 17 at 9:30 PM, with a repeat on Sunday at 11:30 PM. The segment will also be aired during prime time sometime during the week of October 20 on Chicago Tonight; an exact date will be announced soon. WTTW is available over the air on Channel 11, and is Channel 11 on most Chicago-area cable systems.

September 24, 2003

The Oriental Institute

is pleased to announce the following lectures by

Donny George Youkhanna

(General Director for Research with the Iraq State Board of Antiquities, Baghdad)

City, Temples, and Cemeteries

Recent excavations at the Third Millennium B.C. site
of Umm al-Aqarib in southern Iraq

October 1, 2003  12:00 noon
Breasted Hall (Oriental Institute, 1155 E. 58th St.)


Counting the Losses

Six months after the Iraq Museum Looting

October 2, 2003   8:00 p.m.
Mandel Hall (Reynolds Club, 1135 E. 57th St.)

For more information on both events contact 773-834-8098

August 1, 2003

Epigraphic Survey Wins World Monuments Fund Robert W. Wilson Challenge Grant

The Oriental Institute is pleased to announce that the Epigraphic Survey has been awarded a two-year, World Monuments Fund Robert W. Wilson Challenge for Conserving our Heritage matching grant of $95,000. This grant will fund the conservation, protection, documentation, analysis, and reconstruction of decorated sandstone wall and gateway fragments in the Luxor Temple blockyard, and an ongoing structural condition study of the monument itself.

For further information on the work of the Epigraphic Survey

July 7, 2003

"LOST EGYPT: IMAGES OF A VANISHED PAST"
AT THE ORIENTAL INSTITUTE

July 11, 2003 through September 2003

A collection of twenty-nine photographs dating from 1880 to 1930 documenting a "lost Egypt," will be on view at the Oriental Institute Museum of the University of Chicago, 1155 East 58th Street, Chicago, starting Friday, July 11, 2003. The exhibit continues through September 2003.

The large-format glass plate negatives from which these remarkable images of monuments, people, street scenes, and farmers in their fields were produced, were recovered in 1985 when University of Chicago researchers were invited to view a group of 800 photographic negatives that was stored in an attic in Luxor, Egypt. Their importance was immediately recognized, and in 1987, the Epigraphic Survey of the Oriental Institute acquired the entire collection. Twenty-nine of the 800 images are on view.

Although a few of the images are signed by the well-known photographers Zangaki and Beato, most of them are the work of anonymous photographers who hoped to sell their evocative and dreamy images to tourists. The images document a way of life that is largely "lost" to modernization and social change, such as women carrying water, or a "Dame turque," carefully costumed and posed on an elaborate sofa. They are also valuable records of ancient monuments, some of which have been damaged by erosion or vandalism. So too, the overall appearance of well-known monuments, such as the Sphinx, the hypostyle hall of the Temple of Amun at Karnak, and the temples at Deir el Bahari, has been greatly altered over the last century.

The prints in the exhibit were produced by the University of Chicago in Luxor as they originally would have been. Each glass plate negative was exposed to direct sunlight on printing-out paper imported from Paris. Depending upon the density of the negative and the strength of the Luxor sun, exposure times varied between five minutes and two hours. Each print was then toned in gold chloride and fixed in two separate baths for permanence.

The images are available at:
http://www-oi.uchicago.edu/OI/DEPT/PUB/CATALOG/LE.html
and at:
http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/ecuip/diglib/social/ancientegypt/lostegypt/

The Oriental Institute is located at 1155 East 58th Street on the campus of the University of Chicago. The museum is open Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm, Wednesday from 10 am to 8:30 pm, Sunday from noon to 4 pm. The museum is closed on Monday and on major holidays. Suggested donation for admission is $5.00 for adults, $2.00 for children under twelve years of age.

Telephone: 773-702-9514

web site: http://www-oi.uchicago.edu

July 7, 2003

OPENING OF A NEW GALLERY

ANCIENT IRAQ
AT THE ORIENTAL INSTITUTE MUSEUM OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

OPENING OCTOBER 18, 2003

A gallery featuring one the world's great collections of antiquities from ancient Iraq will open Saturday, October 18, 2003 at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, 1155 East 58th Street, Chicago, Il. It joins two other recently opened Oriental Institute galleries, one devoted to Egypt and the other to Persia.

The Edgar and Deborah Jannotta Mesopotamian Gallery that includes more than 2500 objects from 150,000 B.C. to 700 A.D. showcases the permanent collection of the Oriental Institute Museum. Among the treasures are 4500-year-old limestone statues of praying men and women, brightly glazed brick lions from a wall of Babylon, clay tablets with cuneiform inscriptions that document religious and economic practices and other facets of daily life, dozens of finely-cut cylinder seals, tools, pottery, and jewelry. Another section of the gallery is devoted to the prehistory of Iraq and the work of the famed Oriental Institute archaeologists Robert and Linda Braidwood.

Perhaps the most spectacular part of the gallery is the Yelda Khorsabad Court, the recreation of a section of the palace courtyard of the Assyrian king Sargon II (721-705 B.C.). The court is dominated by a monumental 16-foot-tall sculpture of a human-headed winged bull. The walls of the court are lined with ten-foot-tall slabs of stone carved with scenes of the king, his son-prince Sennacherib-and his courtiers. The installation of the Khorsabad Court took ten years of planning, during which time the monumental carved stone slabs were moved from isolated locations in the former museum exhibit to their new location, placing them in a more meaningful and impressive context.

The new Mesopotamian Gallery at the Oriental Institute Museum has special relevance with the recent loss of antiquities from the Iraq National Museum in Baghdad and elsewhere. The recent events in Iraq reminded the world of the importance of the contributions of Mesopotamia culture to civilizations of the world. Fundamental aspects of technology were developed in Mesopotamia including the invention of the 24 hour day, the 356 day year, sail powered boats, the wheel, the earliest cities, codified laws, and among the earliest writing in the world.

The new gallery is part of the on-going renovation of the Oriental Institute Museum, which is one of the few museums in the world that has a comprehensive collection of antiquities from the ancient Middle East. The final galleries, devoted to Syria/Anatolia, Palestine/Israel, and Nubia, will open in the next several years.

The Oriental Institute is offering a wide range of educational programs for adults and children in conjunction with the opening of the new gallery.

The museum is open Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm, Wednesday from 10 am to 8:30 pm, Sunday from noon to 4 pm. The museum is closed on Monday and on major holidays. Suggested donation for admission is $5.00 for adults, $2.00 for children under twelve years of age.

Telephone: 773-702-9514

web site: http://www-oi.uchicago.edu

June 21, 2003

Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship for 2003-2004 Academic Year

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago invites applications for the Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship program for the 2003-2004 academic year. This is a twelve month, non-renewable fellowship. The Post-Doctoral Fellow will organize and conduct a one-to-two day conference at the Oriental Institute on key comparatively-oriented theoretical or methodological issues in the field of ancient studies (archaeological, text-based, and/or art historical avenues of research). We encourage cross disciplinary proposals that deal with the ancient Near East (including Egypt) or that compare the Near East with other cultural areas. The conference will take place in mid-February 2004. After the conference, the Fellow will assemble and edit the proceedings for publication by the Oriental Institute. The Fellow is also encouraged to pursue his or her own research while in residence and to interact with the Oriental Institute community. Qualifications: Ph.D. in a discipline relating to ancient studies must be complete at the time of application. Applicants should send: a) 5-page proposal outlining nature and structure of the conference (including names and paper topics of key participants) b) curriculum vitae, c) 3 letters of reference (these may be sent under separate cover). Electronic submissions are welcome. Deadline for completed applications is August 1, 2003. Start date is October 1, 2003. Send applications to:
Oriental Institute Post-Doctoral Fellowship
Attn. Nicole Torres
Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
1155 East 58th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
e-mail: nitorres@uchicago.edu (with cc to gstein@uchicago.edu).
June 21, 2003

Research Associate. Oriental Institute, University of Chicago.

The Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago invites applications for an academic research position on the Research Associate track to coordinate the Center for the Archaeology of the Middle Eastern Landscape (CAMEL) and develop research in the field of regional analysis in archaeology.

Applicants must have expertise and field experience directing archaeological surface surveys in the Near East/Egypt. In addition, applicants should have expertise in one or more of the following areas: Geographic Information Systems (GIS), geomorphology, remote sensing, geography, or quantitative modeling of settlement systems.

The Research Associate will be expected to develop his or her own field project while working in collaboration with existing faculty and graduate student projects. The Research Associate will also develop and teach up to 3 courses per year on survey and other aspects of landscape archaeology. Experience in grant writing is highly desirable. PhD. required.

The position of Research Associate at the Oriental Institute is one year, renewable for upon to three years. After three years, Research Associates are eligible for review and promotion.

Application deadline is July 12, 2003. We anticipate an Autumn 2003 start date. Please send letter of application, CV, names and addresses of three referees to:

CAMEL Research Associate Search Committee
Attn. Nicole Torres
Director's Office
Oriental Institute
University of Chicago
1155 E. 58th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
March 14, 2003

Festschrift for former Oriental Institute Director William Sumner!

Yeki bud, yeki nabud, Essays on the Archaeology of Iran in Honor of William M. Sumner

Miller, Naomi F. and Kamyar Abdi (editors)

2003, Monograph 48, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles.
$50 hardback, ISBN: 1-931745-05-6, 340 pp., 165 maps, photographs, and drawings, 23 tables, index

For details see, http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~nmiller0/books.html

March 7, 2003

The David Brown Book Company / Oxbow Books are now handling the sale and distributions of all Oriental Institute publications.

NORTH AMERICA UK, EUROPE, &
REST OF THE WORLD
----------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------------------
The David Brown Book Company
PO Box 511
Oakville, CT 06779, USA
Oxbow Books
Park End Place
Oxford, OX1 1HN, UK
Tel: (+1) 860-945-9329
Toll Free: 1-800-791-9354
Tel: (+44) (0) 1865-241-249
Fax: (+1) 860-945-9468 Fax: (+44) (0) 1865-794-449
Email: david.brown.bk.co@snet.net
Website: www.oxbowbooks.com
Email: oxbow@oxbowbooks.com
Website: www.oxbowbooks.com

BOOKSELLERS SHOULD CONTACT THE DAVID BROWN BOOK COMPANY FOR ALL DISCOUNT INFORMATION.

February 26, 2003

Robert & Linda Braidwood Service - April 13, 2003

There will be a memorial service for Robert and Linda Braidwood on Sunday April 13th at 3:30 PM in Rockefeller Memorial Chapel on the campus of the University of Chicago.

For directions see: University of Chicago Maps

January 16, 2003

Linda Braidwood, 1909-2003

Linda Braidwood, a Research Associate at the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago, was a constant companion and professional colleague to her husband, Robert. She died the evening of his death, Wednesday, January 15, in the University of Chicago Hospitals. Linda Braidwood, 93, and Robert Braidwood lived in LaPorte, Indiana.

"Through the years, it is impossible to disentangle Bob Braidwood's contributions from those of his wife, Linda," said Gil Stein, Director of the Oriental Institute. "The two of them were true intellectual partners in addition to their deep personal commitment to each other. Everyone who encountered them over the years was struck by the way they worked together as a team."

Linda Braidwood received a B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1932 and an M.A. in Archaeology from the University of Chicago in 1946.

Linda Braidwood joined her husband on expeditions throughout the Middle East, beginning in 1937. She helped him organize the work and was a frequent collaborator on his projects, which took the couple to Syria, Iraq, Iran and Turkey.

She was a Fulbright Research Fellow in Turkey from 1963 to 1964 and a member of the Editorial Advisory Board for the journal Archaeology from 1952 to 1967.

She published extensively with her husband and other scholars. She was the author of Digging Beyond the Tigris and wrote a number of reviews and other articles.

Text provided by University of Chicago News Office
http://www-news.uchicago.edu/releases/03/030116.braidwood.shtml
January 15, 2003

Robert Braidwood, 1907-2003

Robert Braidwood, Professor Emeritus in the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago, and a leading pioneer in prehistoric archaeology, died Wednesday, Jan. 15, in the University of Chicago Hospitals.

Braidwood, a resident for many years of LaPorte, Indiana, was 95.

His work provided important insights into the development of settled cultures that preceded ancient urban civilization, such as that of the Sumerian civilization that flourished in Mesopotamia beginning in about 3100 B.C.

He discovered a number of important firsts, including the oldest known sample of human blood, the earliest example of hand-worked natural copper and the oldest known piece of cloth. He did early investigations on recovering DNA from blood on ancient artifacts.

He also advanced the scientific study of archaeology by bringing to his teams botanists, zoologists, geologists and other specialists who provided insights about the communities to augment what Braidwood was finding among the artifacts and other archaeological material.

Braidwood introduced the idea of the testable hypothesis to archaeology, and he was the first to use archaeological survey to investigate an entire region.

Throughout his career, his wife, Linda, was a constant companion and partner in his work.

"Bob Braidwood's death marks the passing of an era," said Gil Stein, Director of the Oriental Institute and Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago. "It is difficult to overestimate his professional stature, his impact on the archaeology of the Near East, and his role in archaeology as a general discipline. Over the course of his long and distinguished career, he made numerous major contributions at every level - theory, methodology, and empirical data. More than almost anyone else he exemplified archaeology at the Oriental Institute."

Braidwood, who studied architecture at the University of Michigan, received an M.A. there in 1933. He took a course in Near Eastern archaeology at Michigan and was invited to do field work near Baghdad in 1930. He was hired in 1933 by the legendary founder of the Oriental Institute, James Henry Breasted. Breasted had invented the term "fertile crescent" to describe the rich series of civilizations that developed in the ancient Near East.

Braidwood began his work at the Oriental Institute's archaeological excavation in the Amuq Valley in northern Syria. "It was overwhelmingly successful," said Ray Tindel, registrar of the Oriental Institute and Braidwood's son-in-law. "They brought back tons of material-pottery, stone and other artifacts."

In his work in the Amuq, Braidwood expanded the use of archaeological surveys of ancient sites and set a standard for the approach that continues to be used today. By carefully gathering material from surrounding sites, he was able to precisely date the artifacts in the area by comparing them to material he had recovered from a trench built in step fashion in a mound he had excavated.

He and Linda were married in 1937 and did some field work in the Middle East before the outbreak of World War II. During the war, he was in charge of a meteorological mapping program at the University for the Army Air Corps. He also finished a Ph.D. in 1943.

In 1947, Braidwood learned of work by University of Chicago colleague Willard Libby for dating organic materials on the basis of their radioactive carbon content. He provided some ancient samples for testing. Radiocarbon dating became an essential element for dating materials recovered during the Braidwoods' pioneering work in prehistoric sites.

It was also at this time that Braidwood began serious research on the period beginning about 12,000 years ago in the ancient Near East. That research and teaching led Braidwood and his wife to develop an interest in a neglected area of Near Eastern archaeology-the time about 10,000 years ago between the period of nomadic hunters and gatherers and the period when agriculture emerged and civilization ensued.

For hundreds of thousands of years, human beings had lived as small bands of hunters and gatherers. Suddenly, 10,000 years ago, mankind made the revolutionary transition from food gathering to food producing.

The Braidwoods studied late hunter-gatherer cultures and early farming societies. To conduct research on this important transition, the couple established the Prehistoric Project at the Oriental Institute in 1947.

"We wondered what we would learn were we to concentrate on that threshold of cultural change that must have attended the very earliest domestication of plants and animals," the couple wrote in a report in 1987. Although other scholars had suggested that an agricultural revolution had preceded the development of civilization, no one--until the Braidwoods began their work-had uncovered evidence for the transition.

The project pioneered a new form of archaeology because it required specialists who could examine rubbish, such as fragments of bone, plant remains, and carbonized grain, that had previously been discarded by archaeologists looking for artifacts and architecture. In 1954, the Braidwoods' work with natural science colleagues won them one of the first grants in anthropology made by the National Science Foundation.

The Braidwoods began their work at Jarmo, a site in northeast Iraq, and continued working there until 1958 when a political revolution made Iraq unstable. They then continued their work in Iran and subsequently, in the early 1960s, they traveled to southern Turkey to work to work at Cayonu. It became their principal site, as part of the Joint Prehistoric Project between the University of Chicago and Istanbul University.

At Cayonu, they discovered the oldest known terrazzo floor, which was produced with concrete made of burned lime.

Braidwood was the author of numerous articles on prehistoric archaeology as well as Prehistoric Men , which was published in eight editions and translated into Turkish and Chinese. He received the medal for distinguished archaeological achievement in 1971 from the Archaeological Institute of America.

In addition to his wife, survivors incude a daughter, Gretel Braidwood of Chicago; a son, Douglas Braidwood of Virginia Beach, Virginia; two grandsons and one granddaughter.

Text provided by University of Chicago News Office
http://www-news.uchicago.edu/releases/03/030115.braidwood.shtml
January 12, 2003

Eleanor Swift, 1918-2003

Mrs. Eleanor Swift, 85, wife of Gustavus Franklin Swift III, a field archaeologist and the Oriental Institute's first full-time curator, dies Saturday, January 11, 2002, in her Hyde Park home.

Chicago Tribune Obituary, January 16, 2003

You must register with the Tribune to read the obituary, but the service is free!


Revised: September 14, 2006
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