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FUNERARY STELA

Egypt: Thebes, Ramesseum
Third Intermediate Period
Dynasty 22, ca. 946-712 B.C.
Wood, painted
25.0 cm H, 22.0 cm W
Gift of the Egyptian Research Account, 1896
OIM 1351

Found in the Ramesseum at Thebes, this painted funerary stela was erected to commemorate the lady Djed-Khonsu-es-ankh. The deceased woman, in a diaphanous white gown, wears a cone of perfumed beeswax and a water lily on her head. She pours a libation over a table of food offerings and raises her hand to greet the seated god Re-Harakhty, a form of the ancient Egyptian sun god. The hieroglyphic signs offer a prayer asking the gods to supply food and drink for the survival of her spirit in the netherworld.

The inscription, a standard offering formula, reads:

An offering which the King gives to Re-Harakhty, the Great
God, Lord of Heaven, that he may give invocation-offerings
consisting of offerings and food to the Osiris, Lady of the
House, the noblewoman, Djed-Khonsu-es-ankh, deceased,
daughter of the priest of Amun-Ra, King of the Gods,
Master of the Secrets of the Garments of the Gods, Ser-
Djehuty.


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Revised: November 12, 1997
Copyright 2006 Oriental Institute, University of Chicago
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